Friday, December 4, 2009

Traveler in Chicago

Here I am in The Windy City, and I will tell you it is FREEZING! Tony and I are in town to do some book signings and movie screenings. But, I had a few hours off and decided to get out and see some sights...
I found myself on State Street- that great street, I just want to say, they do things they don't do on Broadway... Chicago, Chicago, that toddling town...

We were up in the Trump Tower for some press. Look at that view! You can see where the Chicago river flows into Lake Michigan. Did you know that the name Chicago came from a French translation of Native American word, shikaakwa, which means "wild onion"?

I went outside to get a closer view of the Chicago River...

Here is a plaque commemorating the French explorer La Salle's journey down the river in December 1681. They must have been so cold in their wet buckskins!

Here is the site of Fort Dearborn, built in 1803. It's right off of the river and Michigan avenue.

Plaques in the street and sidewalk show where the fort actually stood.

Sally and I went into the fort to see if we cold get warm. We couldn't...

This statue by the fort depicts the Fort Dearborn Massacre in 1812.

7 comments:

Sullivan McPig said...

You go to such cool places!!

Found art blog said...

Well, I'm surprised you trusted Sally to lend you her shoulder...! Maybe it's too cold for her to pull any tricks!

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